Consumers willing to give up personal data – if there are benefits

The majority of people are willing to give up their personal data, but only if companies can demonstrate a clear incentive for getting them to do so.

These are the results of a new survey by Infosys, which revealed that there is a level of caution towards data sharing, even in spite of the benefits it can bring.

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Inquiry rejects data retention plans

Controversial plans to keep hold of data relating to Australians' internet and telephone activities have been sidelined by the federal government following an official inquiry.

The Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security was asked to assess whether it would be feasible to hold onto such data for up to two years in case it was required by law enforcement agencies.

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Google ordered to comply with data protection laws

Enforcement action has been launched against Google in Europe, as the company has failed to comply with requests to improve its data protection policies.

An investigation was carried out between February and October last year to find out whether Google's privacy policy met the requirements set out in European data protection legislation.

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Data breach laws ‘would threaten businesses’

Proposals to bring compulsory data breach legislation into force could cause problems for many of the country's businesses, an expert has warned.

Jodie Sangster, chief executive officer of the Association for Data-driven Marketing and Advertising (ADMA), explained that companies do not need more layers of regulation to contend with.

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June 2013 Newsletter

Check out our latest Securus newsletter to see what’s been happening in the security sphere. From mandatory disclosure of data breaches, to vulnerability management, a review of penetration testing to changes in the PCI standards, in this issue, there is something of interest for everyone!

http://createsend.com/t/j-A842B2EA4BEC2ADB

We shouldn’t be responsible for mobile app security, Australians say

Companies and service providers should take responsibility for mobile application security, rather than everyday consumers, a new survey has found.

Carried out by Newspoll, the research showed that 80 per cent of people think that the provider of the service linked to an app – such a bank – should be responsible for the data they collect.

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